Criminalization of the Conduct of the Commercial Mariner -
Continued from Perils of the Sea - Important Reading

The maritime industry is a rough place to work. The maritime
professional must be knowledgeable in so many areas, from
navigation to seamanship to engineering. He or she must at times
be officer, scholar, leader, or follower. The maritime professional
also works in a world that has become increasingly regulated,
much more so today than two or three decades ago. One of the
prices the mariner pays for this is to face criminal liability for things
that in the past may have been treated as negligence, where only
monetary fines would have been imposed. If something goes
wrong on a watch, resulting in a collision, oil spill, injury, death, or
other casualty occurs, the maritime professional is vulnerable to
being prosecuted under criminal laws. In such situations, the
conduct of a mariner could be examined from the standpoint of
criminal penal codes. Such penal codes distinguish whether
someone acts intentionally, knowingly, recklessly, or with gross
negligence. The mariner who acts intentionally will bear the
greatest blame from the legal system. Read about criminal
prosecution of a chief engineer on a car-carrying vessel who was
convicted for by-passing an oily waste separator. Fellow mariners
and friends….PLEASE…PLEASE…PLEASE…Be careful, be lawful
and don’t jeopardize your freedom or your hard-earned license.

Reminder of Attorney General Office's Prosecution of Chief
Engineers and Other Engine Room Personnel

On numerours occasions, the government was able to prove that a
vessel utilized a removable pipe that could be inserted to bypass
the oily-water separator. These pipe sections have been referred to
as magic pipes in the industry and in Department of Justice
criminal prosecutions involving engineering officers aboard cruise
ships. In ordinary operation, the oily-water is meant to remove oil
from overboard waste streams such as bilge pump discharges.














The oily-water separator is a mandatory pollution control device on
ships today. In such cases, the Department of Justice reviews the
ship’s oil record book, required to be produced to the Coast Guard
during inspections. It is a significant legal issue that a defendant
knowingly or negligently does something.























Copyright 2006 -
Copyright Warning
Rights reserved  - U.S. Copyright Law Carries Criminal & Civil
Penalties for Infringement  - 17 U.S.C. § 506 and 18 U.S.C. § 2319
criminalization of the mariner's conduct
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U.S. Department of Labor - These are contact
numbers for Dept of Labor Offices that maintain
regional employment, unemployment, wage
information

ALASKA - Juneau, AK - (907) 465-4518
ARIZONA - Phoenix, AZ - (602) 542-3871
ARKANSAS - Little Rock, AR - (501) 682-4500
CALIFORNIA - Sacramento, CA - (916) 262-2160
COLORADO - Denver, CO - (303) 318-8898
CONNECTICUT, Wethersfield,CT, (860) 263-6255
DELAWARE - Wilmington, DE - (302) 761-8052
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA - (202) 671-1633
FLORIDA - Tallahassee, FL - (850) 488-1048
GEORGIA - Atlanta, GA - (404) 232-3875
GUAM - Tamuning, GU - (671) 475-7062
HAWAII - Honolulu, HI - (808) 586-8996
IDAHO - Boise, ID - (800) 772-2553
ILLINOIS - Chicago, IL - (312) 793-2316
INDIANA - Indianapolis, IN - (317) 232-7460
IOWA - Des Moines, IA - (515) 281-0255
KANSAS - Topeka, KS - (785) 296-5058
LOUISIANA - Baton Rouge, LA - (225) 342-3141
MAINE - Augusta, ME - (207) 287-2271
MARYLAND - Baltimore, MD - (410) 767-2250
MASSACHUSETTS - Boston, MA - (617) 626-6556
MICHIGAN - Detroit, MI - (313) 456-3090
MINNESOTA - St. Paul, MN - (651) 282-2714
MISSISSIPPI - Jackson, MS - (601) 321-6261
MISSOURI - Jefferson City, MO - (573) 751-3609
U.S. Department of Labor - These are contact
numbers for Dept of Labor Offices that maintain
regional employment, unemployment, wage
information.

MONTANA - Helena, MT - (406) 444-2430
NEBRASKA - Lincoln, NE - (402) 471-9964NEVADA -
Carson City, NV - (775) 684-0387
NEW HAMPSHIRE - Concord, NH - (603) 228-4123
NEW JERSEY - Trenton, NJ 08625 - (609) 292-0099
NEW MEXICO - Albuquerque, NM - (505) 222-4683
NEW YORK - Albany, NY - (518) 457-6369
NORTH CAROLINA - Raleigh, NC - (919) 733-2936
NORTH DAKOTA - Bismarck, ND - (701) 328-2868
OHIO - Columbus, OH - (614) 752-9494
OKLAHOMA - Oklahoma City, OK - (405) 557-7265
OREGON - Salem, OR - (503) 947-1212
PENNSYLVANIA - Harrisburg, PA - (717) 787-3266
PUERTO RICO Hato Rey, PR - (787) 754-5340
RHODE ISLAND - Cranston, RI - (401) 462-8767
SOUTH CAROLINA - Columbia, SC - (803) 737-2660
SOUTH DAKOTA - Aberdeen, SD - (605) 626-2314
TENNESSEE - Nashville, TN - (615) 741-2284
TEXAS - Austin, TX -
UTAH - Salt Lake City, UT - (801) 526-9401
VERMONT - Montpelier, VT - (802) 828-4153
VIRGIN ISLANDS, Charlotte Amalie, VI 340 776-3700
VIRGINIA - Richmond, VA - (804) 786-7496
WASHINGTON - Lacey, WA - (360) 438-4804
WEST VIRGINIA - Charleston, WV - (304) 558-2660
WISCONSIN - Madison, WI - (608) 267-2393
WYOMING - Casper, WY - (307) 473-3807
Commercial mariners
Source: NSTB
This vessel ran aground in the Bering Sea after experiencing a failure of